My Name is Eva By Suzanne Goldring Review

 

My Name is Eva, tells the story of an old lady who is now in a home who gives the impression of losing her memory, by telling her niece one thing that she had for dinner when she had something else on purpose. She even does the Telegraph crossword using a newly sharpened pencil then writes over it in ink with random letters.

Eva’s past, is of, reveng and heartbreak form both World War II and her time working in post war Germany. She has recently moved into the nursing home and has given the power of attorney to her niece, who is now sorting out her home and finds various clues to Eva’s past. Which even now Eva has kept secret from her family.

The novel has three distinct ways of telling the story the first is through Eva’s thoughts and conversations, in the nursing home, the second is in flash backs to past events in her life and the final one is in letters to her husband written at the time of the flash backs. The advantage of this format is that it allows the author Suzanne Goldring, to drip feed the answers to the questions that her niece Pat, is asking as she finds things in her Aunts house, some before and some after with how Eva handles the questions that arise.

My Name is Eva by Suzanne Goldring, is well worth the time it takes to read as it examines the life of a person in a retirement home, who every one sees as an elderly lady, who is losing her memory but has had a life which looking at her now you would never know.

Connections to other books

My name is Eva could almost be a follow up to my previous book that I reviewed, The Lost Girls Of Paris, as it deals with, the after effects of actions done during War and the immediate post war period rather than the actions them selves. Although I did not chose to read these books one after the other because I did not know the plot lines of both books it was such a pleasant surprise that the two books joined together so well, which enhanced my enjoyment of both books.

My Name is Eva, tells the story of an old lady who is now in a home who gives the impression of losing her memory, by telling her niece one thing that she had for dinner when she had something else on purpose. She even does the Telegraph crossword using a newly sharpened pencil then writes over it in ink with random letters.

Eva’s a past, of revenge heartbreak form World War 2 and her time working in post war Germany. She has recently moved into the nursing home and has given the power of attorney to her niece, who is now going through her home and finds various clues to Eva’s past. Which even now she has kept secret from her family.     

The novel has three distinct ways of telling the story the first is through Eva’s thoughts and conversations, in the nursing home, the second is in flash backs to past events in her life and the final one is in letters to her husband written at the time of the flash backs. The advantage of this format is that it allows the author Suzanne Goldring, to drip feed the answers to the questions that the niece is asking as she finds things in her Aunts house, some before and some after that the reader knows the answers, with how Eva handles the questions that arise.

Connections to other books

My name is Eva could almost be a follow up to, The Lost Girls Of Paris by Pam Jenoff (reviewed here), as it deahe after effects of actions done during War and the immediate post war period rather than the actions them selves. Although I did not chose to read these books one after the other because I did not know the plot lines of both books it was such a pleasant surprise that the two books joined together so well, which enhanced my enjoyment of both books.

This book is well worth the time it takes to read on its own, as it examines the life of a person in a retirement home, who every one sees as an elderly lady, who is losing her memory, but has had a life which looking at her now you would never know, and will had Suzane Goldirng’s other book  Burning Island to my TBR which comes out in the uk january 2020 in the uk .

Burning Island

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