Sons And Lovers Review

The novel Sons and Lovers by D.H, Lawrence, is a story of an aspiring young artist Paul Morel growing up in a mining village in Nottinghamshire, at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries. It starts from the marriage of his parents Gertrude Coppard, from a good family and Walter Morel, a poor minor.

The marriage is an unhappy one when Gertrude finds out Walter has less money then she first thought . When the couple inevitably drift apart, as Walter retreats to the pub and Gertrude pours her love on to two of their sons, first William the eldest and then Paul based on the author, who both come to hate and despise their drunk and uneducated farther. The story then follows William and paul’s life as they grow up and become fully grown adults.

d_h_lawrence_1915.jpg
D. H. Lawerence as a young man

 

I read Sons and lovers as part of the Modern Mrs Darcy Reading Challenge, (which i wrote about here), in the Local writer section. I had not read any of Lawrence’s work before. So I thought that this would be a chance to try a writer of renown, that I had not read before. My perception of Lawrence before reading him was that of a writer of high brow and controversial books. For example the court case of Lady Chatterley’s Lover in   England in 1959.

However the book Itself could not have been further from my preconception. Looking at it from the perspective of reading it over 100 years after the book was first published in 1913. the writing style the book was, enjoyable to read and although there was local dialect used in the book, this was not excessive, and the meaning could be gained by the context. This meant that the writing style was easy to read with each part following easily from one to another, with each location (some even recognisable to me), and individual characters well defined.  

I am happy to recommend this book to my readers . Although I have not read any more of D.H. Lawrence work yet, either his novels such as Women in love and The Rainbow as well as his short stories, they have been added to my ever growing TBR list to be read at later date

 

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